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Vaginal ring for HIV prevention effective and acceptable PDF Print E-mail
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An updated adherence analysis from the ASPIRE study indicates that consistent users of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine experienced 65% fewer infections, the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban, South Africa heard last month. Some additional analyses suggested a higher level of effectiveness. Moreover, African women who took part in the study told researchers that they liked the product, found it easy to use and preferred it to possible alternatives such as tablets or vaginal gels. Read full article here.

 
Hail to Malawi's She-Chief Fighting HIV PDF Print E-mail
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When the International AIDS Conference is held in Africa, not only do you get Elton John, Queen Latifah and the rest of the celebrity set in attendance, but African royalty appear as well. They’re concerned for their people—and it’s these traditional leaders, as opposed to politicians, that often hold sway. That’s especially true in Malawi, where 10.3% of the population lives with HIV. Reflecting gender disparities in the country, more women (12.9 percent) than men (8.1 percent) have the disease, according to the UK-based organization, AVERTing HIV and AIDS. However, Malawi’s rate of new infection has been dropping, and perhaps that’s in part due to Senior Chief Theresa John Ndovie Kachindamoto. Read full article here.

 
HIV Infection Decreases Survival in Women With Invasive Cervical Cancer PDF Print E-mail
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HIV infection significantly decreases survival among women with invasive cervical cancer, according to a study conducted in Botswana. This was the case even though most women with HIV received antiretroviral therapy. “Cervical cancer is the most common cause of cancer death among African women, and the HIV epidemic intensifies this burden,” wrote study authors led by Scott Dryden-Peterson, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. The use of antiretroviral therapy for HIV can reduce the frequency and duration of the HPV strains that can cause cervical cancer, but incidence of the malignancy has not decreased since HIV treatment expanded. The impact of HIV on survival from cervical cancer has not been well studied before. Read full article here.

 
New study finds previously incarcerated women with HIV less likely to adhere to HIV treatment PDF Print E-mail
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The British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BCCfE) has released new research that finds previously incarcerated women with HIV are three times more likely to have poor adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy than HIV positive women who have not been incarcerated. The research comes from a survey conducted by Canadian HIV Women’s Sexual & Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS), Canada’s largest multi-site community-based cohort study, with 1,425 women living with HIV enrolled in the provinces of British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. Read full article here.

 
Effectiveness of new anti-HIV medication to protect women and infants demonstrated PDF Print E-mail
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HIV remains a major health concern for women and children globally. Worldwide, the majority of new HIV infections occur in young women. Each year, 1.5 million women living with HIV become pregnant. Without effective treatment, up to 45 percent of HIV-infected mothers will transmit the virus to their child, usually through breastfeeding. In an effort to prevent HIV transmission to women and their children, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill demonstrated the effectiveness of a new anti-HIV medication, 4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'deoxyadenosine or EFdA, in pre-clinical animal models. They found that EFdA can prevent vaginal and oral transmission of HIV. Read full article here.

 
For Young South Africans, a Pill a Day to Keep HIV Away PDF Print E-mail
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In sub-Saharan Africa, girls and young women account for 71 percent of new HIV infections among adolescents. South African officials hope more access to pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, will help, but experts say stigma and lack of education could doom those efforts. Read full article here.

 
UNAIDS warns that after significant reductions, declines in new HIV infections among adults have stalled and are rising in some regions. PDF Print E-mail
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A new report by UNAIDS reveals concerning trends in new HIV infections among adults. The Prevention gap report shows that while significant progress is being made in stopping new HIV infections among children (new HIV infections have declined by more than 70% among children since 2001 and are continuing to decline), the decline in new HIV infections among adults has stalled. The report shows that HIV prevention urgently needs to be scaled up among this age group.  Read full article here.

 
Male circumcision and HIV antiretroviral drugs 'significantly reduce new infections' PDF Print E-mail
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An increasing prevalence of male circumcision among Ugandan communities, has been linked to a fall in the number of HIV infections. The practice, in conjunction with more HIV-positive women being given antiretroviral drugs, has brought about 'significant declines' in the disease, new research suggests. The two interventions, observed in rural Ugandan communities, were successful in tightly controlled clinical trials, and have 'real-world implications'. The findings, published today (12 July 2016) in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), are believed to be the first of their kind. Read full article here.

 
Young Women In Kenya More Likely To Get Tested For HIV When Sent Weekly Texts About Sexual Health PDF Print E-mail
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Text messages have revolutionized the way we interact with each other — and the way we receive and practice health care may be next. The latest research proves they can also increase the rate of HIV testing among the groups who are more vulnerable to infection; in this particular case, young women living in rural Africa. Read full article here.

 
HIV testing and treatment campaigns need to target women and the under 35s. PDF Print E-mail
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A recently released study in the Journal of  Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome has shown that  “HIV testing and treatment should be prioritized to target young people and women, while novel strategies are necessary to reach men.” Read full article here.

 
El Nino, La Nina could lead to spike in new HIV infections in Africa: UNICEF PDF Print E-mail
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Drought exacerbated by the El Nino weather pattern could lead to a spike in new HIV infections in southern Africa as women and girls turn to sex to survive and patients miss treatments, the United Nations children’s' agency UNICEF said. Read full article here.

 
Promoting HIV testing of men through female partners and sex workers PDF Print E-mail
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A study in Kenya finds that the provision of multiple HIV self-tests to women at high risk of HIV infection was successful in promoting HIV testing among their sexual partners and in facilitating safer sexual decisions. This novel strategy warrants further consideration as countries develop self-testing policies and programmes. Read full article here.
 
Telling women to avoid pregnancy is not a solution for HIV and the Zika virus PDF Print E-mail
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It is widely recognized that, if the transformations outlined in the sustainable development goals (SDGs) are to be achieved, respecting, protecting and fulfilling the human rights of women and girls – including their sexual and reproductive rights – will be essential. Read full article here.
 
UN General Assembly adopts political declaration to fast-track progress on ending AIDS PDF Print E-mail
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At a high-level meeting on ending AIDS that opened at the United Nations General Assembly today (8th June), Member States adopted a new political declaration that includes a set of time-bound targets to fast-track the pace of progress towards combating the worldwide scourge of HIV and AIDS over the next five years and end the epidemic as a public health threat by 2030. Read full article here.
 
HIV-Positive Women In Uganda Are Being Sterilized Without Their Consent PDF Print E-mail
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A study in Uganda, which looked at HIV-positive women between 15 and 49 years old in nine districts across the country, found that 72 of the total 744 women studied reported having undergone forced and coerced sterilization, and 20 of them were pressured into sterilization in clinical settings, like hospitals. The study also found that three young women were forced into abortions, often unsafe in the country, by their families.   

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